Start Submission Become a Reviewer

Reading: Managers’ Environmental Altruism and Firms’ Compliance to National Environmental Management ...

Download

A- A+
dyslexia friendly

Articles

Managers’ Environmental Altruism and Firms’ Compliance to National Environmental Management Strategies: Evidence from the Food Processing Sector in Sri Lanka

Authors:

Menuka Udagama ,

Department of Agribusiness Management, Faculty of Agriculture and Plantation Management, Wayamba University of Sri Lanka, Makandura, Gonawila (NWP), LK
X close

Udith K Jayasinghe-Mudalige,

Department of Agribusiness Management, Faculty of Agriculture and Plantation Management, Wayamba University of Sri Lanka, Makandura, Gonawila (NWP), LK
X close

GHI Anjalee

Department of Agribusiness Management, Faculty of Agriculture and Plantation Management, Wayamba University of Sri Lanka, Makandura, Gonawila (NWP), LK
X close

Abstract

The environmental economics literature highlights that incentive-based policies (e.g. taxes, tradable permits) are more efficient than command-and-control type regulations that require each firm to adopt the same abatement technology and that the adoption of such controls in the firm is not only driven by organizational-level determinants but are also the outcomes of environmental paradigms of the management or rather its environmental altruism. Hence, this study was aimed to examine the degree of influence their altruistic behavior possess in complying to the environmental management controls, using the special case of “non-adopters” of the “National Strategy for Solid Waste Management” recently introduced by the Ministry of Environment, under which, a set of environmental management controls with the characteristics of technology standards are recommended for the Sri Lankan food processing industry to minimize the accumulation of solid waste in the firm and reduce industrial pollution as a whole. The firms involved with processing of different types of food products at various scales in the most densely populated provinces in Sri Lanka, but did not comply with any of the environmental controls recommended by the ministry by May 2010 (n=150) were selected for the study. Data were collected through personal interviews with the person responsible for implementing environmental controls of the firm, supported by a structured questionnaire comprised of a set of attitudinal statements which encapsulates the degree of environmental altruism of the respondent. The scores given to each statement by the firms on a two-way fivepoint Likert scale were subjected to a series of Multivariate Data Analysis techniques (e.g. Principle Component Analysis, Scale Reliability testing), and the outcome of which was used to derive an Environmental Altruistic Index (EAI) and a Weighted Environmental Altruism Index (WEAI) – an additive index of which the values range from -1.00 (perfectly non-altruistic) to 1.00 (perfectly altruistic). The results suggest that the values of EAI were relatively low i.e. 0.25, on an average, of the WEAI ranges from -1 to 1. This implies that, amongst the other internal (e.g. cost, efficiency) and external (e.g. commercial pressure, liability) forces and coercive government pressure, it is equally important to augment the environmental altruism of decision-makers through better education and awareness programs alongside an incentive-based regulatory framework to increase the level of adoption of environmental controls at the firm level.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4038/jfa.v2i2.4175

JFA 2009; 2(2): 6-15

How to Cite: Udagama, M., Jayasinghe-Mudalige, U.K. & Anjalee, G., (2012). Managers’ Environmental Altruism and Firms’ Compliance to National Environmental Management Strategies: Evidence from the Food Processing Sector in Sri Lanka. Journal of Food and Agriculture. 2(2), pp.6–15. DOI: http://doi.org/10.4038/jfa.v2i2.4175
Published on 24 Mar 2012.
Peer Reviewed

Downloads

  • PDF (EN)

    comments powered by Disqus